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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Dear Female Doc: I’m concerned about a career in medicine

Dear Female Doc,
I am a high school student interested in pursuing a career in medicine. When researching the profession, I have seen a lot of articles about the huge number of depressed and suicidal doctors, which has worried me a little bit. Do you think that these posts are over exaggerating, or are there really a ton of depressed doctors? If so, do you have any tips to avoid depression? Thank you!
Sincerely,
Concerned

5 Misconceptions of Physicians [Explained by a Young Female Doctor]

“Oh, you’re my doctor? A woman?”

Who do you picture walking through the exam room door at your new doctor’s office? Is it the Norman Rockwell depiction of an older, jolly looking male? After residency, I was alarmed at how many patients commented on my age and gender:

“How old are you, 12?” or, “Oh, you’re my doctor? A woman?”

This got me thinking about misconceptions people have about doctors, and I thought I could share a few things many people may not know about their favorite neighborhood doctor.

A Look at the Doctor Title [different female viewpoints]

When I first began writing about the “doctor” title, I lead with my personal beliefs but as my research expanded I realized there were so many variables and so many experiences that have shaped other women’s views on being called “doctor.”

Dear Female Doc: I’m exhausted

Dear Female Doc,
I came across your blog and am glad to see that I’m not the only one experiencing burnout. I am currently in a Pulmonary and Critical Care fellowship and feel physically, intellectually and emotionally drained.

What Does a Doctor Look Like?

The New Yorker cover from last week has sparked a lot of discussion about what a surgeon looks like. In this article, guest blogger Jack Turban discusses the research and his thoughts behind gender and racial bias in medicine.

D.O. Day On The Hill: Getting Involved in Politics is Important

Our country’s political climate has changed dramatically this year. As healthcare providers, we’re powerful leaders in our communities and across the country. When faced with times of injustice, activism becomes a responsibility. It becomes vital for us to not only advocate for our patients and future patients, but also raise awareness for policies that affect our healthcare system and providers.